In the Mental-Health Trenches With Three Valiant Mothers

Please carve out a few minutes and listen to these powerful, articulate advocates discuss the most overlooked social and moral blight of our time. 

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1604296/9101018

Just Read This.

Teresa Pasquini’s magificent, tender, searing essay below speaks for so many of us. I’ve seldom read a more encompassing and truth-telling message from anyone in our sub-nation. I applaud the subtle and not-so-subtle political and cultural indictments in it as well. Godspeed, eloquent amiga!

My thoughts this 4th of July with a variety of pictures of my beloved son over the years showing his love of life and freedom. “Lets Free Danny with a system of Housing That Heals”

The 4th of July is a good day to talk about freedom. It is the day we Americans cherish and celebrate freedom. It should also be a day to reflect on those who are not free in America. I have a special memory that I will always hold of traveling to Washington, DC on the 4th of July to fight for the freedom of #FamiliesLikeMine. I talk about that trip and the history of that work in this post, https://www.facebook.com/teresa.pasquini.3/posts/10213321797638040. It is a good reflection to hold in my heart as I think about the intentions of today’s freedom fighters.

Today, there is a national focus on the freedom of one person, Britney Spears. The “Free Britney” campaign has created a national myth-making media machine that excludes some of the most vulnerable members of our society. My son is one of those who have been excluded. As the mother of a beloved son who has been on a “conservatorship” in California for approximately 20 years, I have been waiting to weigh in on the Britney Spears conservatorship controversy until I could analyze the information objectively. I have been too triggered and traumatized by the sideline commentary of people who don’t know what the hell they are talking about and their armchair analysis is ill-informed and dangerous. It needs to be countered by a mom who knows the truth and can defend conservatorships as a freedom-giving and life-saving tool for many families and their loved ones.

Yesterday, I took the time to read multiple articles, talk to friends who act as their family members’ conservator, and reflect on the past 20 years that my son and our family has experienced the “conservatorship continuum” in California. First, I read the New Yorker Magazine article, https://www.newyorker.com/…/britney-spears…, which is actually one of the better reported. It clearly demonstrates a disturbing picture of a young Britney who was used and abused by many predators and by a system intended to protect her. I won’t do a sideline judgment of her family’s intentions because I didn’t walk in their shoes. But I have walked in similar shoes and can comment on my own experience.

The “Free Britney” movement has nothing to do with my 20-year mission as a mother to “Free Danny.” You cannot and must not conflate and equate the two-track conservatorship laws in California. You cannot mix up the medical system, behavioral health system, guardianship, legal, and justice systems to create reform for some while others suffer needlessly. I have watched advocates and legislators do this for years. I have watched Disability Rights of California do this for years. This has made necessary reform impossible for people who are disabled by their “serious mental illness.” Now is the time for getting real reform for all. And all must mean all.

This past year, the research of Dr. Alex Barnard shined a light on how the California Conservatorship continuum lacks authority and accountability. His work has sparked conversation and understanding about the grave inequity of deciding grave disability in California. His work has also demonstrated that too often families like mine must put our loved ones and communities in danger in order to get them help before they harm themselves or others. He offers solutions in his paper, https://drive.google.com/…/1H-hKxnd…/view that has been widely shared and will influence necessary change.

Dr. Barnard has also weighed in on the Brittney Spears movement yesterday in this Sacramento Bee OpEd, “Free Britney, but CA must also reform conservatorship laws …” I agree with most of his points but don’t believe that the solutions for freeing Britney, Danny, my brother(also previously on an LPS Conservatorship) and possibly my 90-year-old mom are as straight forward as he suggests.

Those of us who may face possible capacity issues with our elderly parents don’t need extra hoops to jump through if and when we try to protect their health and safety. We must not create laws based on the worst actors in our society who take advantage of the most vulnerable. Most people do the right thing within the current Probate laws. So, I don’t know that making Probate Conservatorships as hard to access and maintain as an LPS Conservatorship is the answer. More accountability for both is definitely warranted.

This Disability Rights OpEd offers solutions similar to Dr. Barnard’s. https://time.com/…/britney-spears-conservatorship…/ along with this one, https://www.dailyjournal.com/…/363398-spears…. But, again, the laws that govern different disabilities are being conflated and equated. We cannot define freedom in the same way for all disabilities. And we have to stop implying that the same solutions are appropriate for all.

We need a system of solutions that is flexible, funded, and full. We now have a system of care that is not full or complete for those people who ARE gravely disabled and can’t get treatment before tragedy. The lack of capacity standards for the SMI population is not adequately being considered in reform conversations because we treat some disabling brain illnesses as a “mental/behavioral” issue rather than a medical illness. We must no longer cherry-pick which brain illness deserves a right to treatment and dignified housing or who is left to die on the streets with their rights on.

My Danny has been on an LPS Conservatorship for 20 years. While it did save his life and his civil rights were overprotected in many ways, there was nothing civil or right about the care, treatment, and support he received. The current laws did not protect his right to health, safety, and freedom in the appropriate “least restricted environment.”

While on conservatorship he has been forcibly locked away in faraway institutions, placed in solitary confinement, shunned, punished, and suffered in too many ways. And, while people talk about using conservatorship as a last resort, they need to know that families like mine DID use it as a last resort while being forced to make our loved ones gravely disabled and homeless. It is a cruel and usual process protected by too many and it lacks the clarity of the broken mental health system’s reality.

As the author of the Facebook blog, “Broken”, recently said, “Anyone can present as clear for the few minutes she [Britney] was speaking to the court. Without a professional who has examined her, we can’t really know how stable she really is. And just because she can make a speech to plead for her “freedom” doesn’t mean she can manage her finances. This decision is bigger than any of us can know. We only see what the media tells us.” There is that measure of sanity at the moment that looks only at imminent risk rather than the historical course of the illness. Capacity must be measured using a big picture, not a snapshot.

Appearances are misleading. 18 years ago, my Danny appeared well, both psychiatrically and physically, was taking his meds, had a room in a board and care and so his conservatorship was dismissed against our family wishes. That very night he stopped his meds. About a week later, he was on the BART tracks threatening to jump. He was 5150d (one of the 40 5150s he has endured) again and put back on an LPS. He has remained conserved for the past 18 years.

The conservatorship is what has enabled Danny to be free and stay free. He is adequately protected when the conservatorship renewals take place. He has psychiatrists who work with him to discuss his current state. He has a mom and dad who he relies on for advice. He has a public conservator who he trusts. He is represented by a public defender who is knowledgeable in conservatorship law. He has the capacity now to know that he needs support and help. However, he doesn’t understand why there is still no system of Housing That Heals to provide the medically necessary continuity of care to protect his freedom and not risk his dignity again should he go off of his conservatorship.

We talked about it just last week. He called and said, “Mom, if I go off conservatorship will you and dad help me?” I said, “Of course we will always “help” you, but we can no longer house you and be your sole caregivers. We have tried to do that off and on for over 20 years while ON an LPS Conservatorship and it didn’t work for any of us.” He said, “I understand mom. I will stay on it.” He might change his mind between now and when that decision is made by his doctors and the courts later this year. I will support him to learn about his options and I will fight for his right to live in as much freedom as is possible. I am a freedom fighter, too.

“Free Britney?” Probably. Britney has a house, food, and estate worth 60 million bucks to prevent her from becoming gravely disabled again. She deserves her freedom but should have a clear shared decision-making plan moving forward that will protect her health and wealth. I want that for her and for Danny. They both have movements fighting for their rights. Danny’s is different. It is a Moms On a Mission movement for a right to live in Housing That Heals. This movement is growing.

Housing and healing have been my mission for years. It is a mission that is ignored by many progressive Californians. The progressive movement elevates the right to shelter and the right to housing above the right to treatment. They protect one’s right to refuse treatment even if you lack the capacity to know you need it. A recent article by Heather Knight drives the issues home for the liberal /progressive California, San Francisco’s mental health care system fails two men: one killed, the other his allegedkiller.https://www.sfchronicle.com/…/San-Francisco-s-mental….

San Francisco Supervisor Mandelman is quoted and is right. There is nothing progressive, civil, or right to see here. “It’s the most dystopian version of progressive politics,” Mandelman said. “We’re all about civil liberties, but we don’t make the investments in basic services for sick people. We have this entirely negative version of liberty, about being free from things. But your freedom to live a decent life with dignity? We apparently don’t care about that at all.”

What would be progressive is if we would stop treating SMI as a “behavioral problem” instead of a brain illness. I don’t see that movement going on in California. Just more of the same. A lot of talk about peer support, which is great for many, but not all. Where is the talk about medical support in treatment facilities with compassionate providers who are given a continuum of services to support their patients upon release?. That continuum must include conservatorships as a prevention and intervention program for people like Danny who need more time to heal than his brain allowed him to understand in 24-72 hours. He understands now but it should not have taken 20 years of forced suffering to “Free Danny.”

As many know, Danny continues to improve while living in the community and he remains on an LPS Conservatorship. As it has for the past 20 years, it will be up for renewal again later this year. We as a family will consider all options in a shared decision-making process with Danny, his doctors, and his conservator. We continue to be grateful to Contra Costa Health Services and the Contra Costa Public Guardian’s office for partnering with our family over the years to help Danny live his best life. We hope that partnership will continue whatever happens next on Danny’s recovery journey.

I hope that the media, disability rights organizations, public defenders, legislators, social justice reformers, housing rights, and other mental health advocates will not forget to fight for Danny to live his life in health, safety, and freedom. And, I hope that they will join the Housing That Heals movement that seeks a system of care that will never risk anyone’s dignity by letting them be homeless, failed, and jailed. And, that they will protect the life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness of all. And, all means all.

Happy 4th of July 2021. Let freedom ring today and every day in the USA. P.S. Thank you Kathy Day for your help with thinking this difficult subject through and for your great editing support!

Teresa Pasquini

DID SOMEONE MENTION “SOLITARY”?

Yes: I did.

I cited this barbaric penalty in my previous blog post, which was a plea for Ashley Biden to join her father’s Administration and co-ordinate federal policy regarding mental healthcare reform. Solitary confinement in our jails is one of the scourges that most needs reforming–obliterating, actually–if we are to call ourselves civilized. Solitary works horrors on the human brain. It drives mentally ill prisoners deeper into madness, and can afflict the sanity of those who have not shown symptoms of brain disease. And it does no good whatsoever–corrective, societal, or moral. That is the widespread theory. Here is the latest glimpse of the widespread practice.

Original bed inside solitary confinement cell in old Franklin County Jail, Pennsylvania. Credit: Andrea Linefsky, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

ASHLEY BIDEN, WE NEED YOU!

Will you step up as the standard-bearer for the mentally ill?

Full disclosure: I have struggled with this blog post for days: post it or throw it away? Revise it one more time so that it reads as Beltway-savvy, or put on my Mister Smith hat and hope it will ignite a 1939 Hollywood moment? Decide to not intrude into the life-choices of an honorable private woman who made it clear recently that she wants to remain private, or say the hell with it and make the intrusion anyway?

Hell with it. Here goes:

On August 23rd of last year, America lost one of the two or three greatest champions of mental healthcare reform since Dorothea Dix. The vast sub-nation of the afflicted, their families, and their ardent yet scattered and over-burdened advocates is seeking a replacement: someone who can help unify this nationwide archipelago of sufferers into a single movement with a coherent voice.

I believe that Ashley Biden, the new President’s daughter, is the person most graced by fate to advance our mission. And I will tell you why: in addition to her experience and expertise in mental health issues, Ms. Biden would embody an influential link to policymakers that the afflicted and their caretakers have yearned for roughly since the founding of the Bedlam Asylum in 1377.

Ashley Biden in 2016

I can already hear the screams of “nepotism!” from the President’s political foes. (At the same time, I’m mindful that some of the most stalwart friends of the mentally ill have been Republicans.)

As Elizabeth Warren used to say, I have a plan for that: make Ms. Biden an unpaid White House staff advisor specializing in the interests of the mentally ill.

(Ashley, is there anything else I can do to enhance your life before I sign off??)

Let me give a thumbnail sketch of the man whose death has created such a vacuum: 

Dj Jaffe

Dj Jaffe was 65 when cancer took him from us. Most Americans had never heard of him. Yet within the archipelago, he was a superhero. He’d walked away from a cushy career in advertising to take up the cause when his sister-in-law developed schizophrenia. He understood and worked with Congress, the courts, community health centers, and the county jail, having mastered the complexities of schizophrenia and its related chronic predators upon the human brain. In 2011 he founded the indispensable Mental Illness Policy Org., a colossus of links to data, information, helpful sources, and policymakers. He was a co-founder of the Treatment Advocacy Center along with his own personal hero, the pioneering E. Fuller Torrey. His nonprofit book, Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill, is the single most comprehensive manual on the subject in our time.

Dj Jaffe’s passing has left an unacceptable void of wisdom, energy, and passion at the center of our efforts to reclaim the grievously broken systems of mental healthcare in America. There are dozens of men and women who would do credit to my late friend’s legacy. And then there is Ashley Biden.

As I say, Ms. Biden has made it clear that she dislikes “the spotlight,” and bravo for that. Yet her role as an advisor to her father, or perhaps as director of a new foundation, need not entail being in the spotlight so much as seizing the spotlight. And turning it around upon a shadow-enshrouded system that to this day abuses insane people with barbaric neglect and cruelty reminiscent of the Middle Ages.

With scattered exceptions, the mental-illness archipelago historically has been starved of government access. And when any level of government intervenes, it usually leaves things worse than they were. (I write this as a believer in active government.) 

Think of “deinstitutionalization,” the sixty-year-old policy disaster that set off the national homeless calamity that expands to this day. Think of county jails as our new, dysfunctional mental hospitals. Think of mind-destroying solitary confinement, a useless torture practice that too often serves as a convenient storage-box for possibly prodromal juveniles. Think of un-convicted juveniles, untreated afflicted kids among them, waiting behind bars, often for weeks and months, for their trials. Think of untrained or uncaring police killing psychotic victims on the streets. 

The crises and atrocities cited above are known to most people with a passing interest in the squalid fate of “crazy people” in America. The wish-list below will seem arcane to lay readers; yet it is packed with urgent, unaddressed problems that stunt and shorten the lives of the chronically mental ill, spread a widening cone of misery through their families and communities, and diminish the financial—and moral—health of the nation.

I’m indebted for this list to Leslie Carpenter of Iowa City, who with her husband Scott forms a tireless advocacy duo in America. Here it is:

–End the outdated, discriminatory federal rule known as the IMD Exclusion. This will increase the number of acute-care and long-term beds.

–Increase reimbursement rates for mental health professionals, direct care staff and facilities. This will help with recruitment, retention and quality of staff caring for people with serious mental illness (SMI).

–Modify the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) to allow for more reasonable communication with families who are all too often the unpaid caregivers for loved ones with SMI.

–Increase funds for continued research for schizophrenia and related brain disorders.

–Fund and expand Assisted Outpatient Treatment Programs, along with Civil and Criminal Mental Health Courts.

–Expand funding for Certified Community Behavioral Health Centers in every state in the country.

–Stop wasting money on unproductive anti-stigma campaigns and. Use those funds to pay for the treatment of the most seriously ill, and the stigma will go away.

–Stop funding just more housing. Allow HUD subsidized funding for residential care facilities, group homes and facilities all along the continuum of care for people living with SMI and substance use disorders. Funded housing, tied with assisted outpatient treatment (AOT) programs, will allow the housing of people who don’t know they are sick, and keep them in treatment via outpatient civil commitments for treatment.

–Stop shutting down Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) if someone has to be hospitalized for 30 days or more. Shutting down the ability to pay rent is a major cause of homelessness among the chronic mentally ill. 

–Create loan forgiveness incentives for mental health professionals practicing in rural locations.

–Fund medical schools to increase enrollment for psychiatrists and other mental health professional programs including nurse practitioners, physician assistants and psychologists.

Every one of these proposals requires intense, coordinated governmental action. As of today, there is no governmental coordinator. Not even Dj Jaffe had such power. This thin and secretly failing hero drew upon his extraordinary passion, his vast self-education in this complex cluster of subjects, and his gift for eloquence in the media, in testimony, and in his book.

The dispossessed mentally ill people among us cry out for a figure to replace Jaffe, and perhaps even surpass his legacy. Given Ashley Biden’s training, intelligence, commitment to the cause of mental health, and principled access to the (recently besmirched) corridors of congressional power, I believe that she could be this figure—a catalyst for reclamation.

We live in a fragile national moment, a moment saturated with promise and with menace. On the hopeful side, I marvel at the brisk accomplishments of President Biden’s first weeks in office, and I hear an old trumpet sounding, and I can almost envision a second New Frontier. On the dark side linger the shock-images and aural bedlam of the Capitol insurrection and the miasma of the impeachment trial, with portents of worse to come. And I wonder whether collective psychosis—madness—is our new pandemic.

It will take every person of good will to steer our future toward the light. Mental illness is just one item in a crushing agenda; yet it looms over us all, a scourge of mostly unfathomed proportions. (How far have some of us drifted into collective psychosis? Is there momentum in this direction?) A voice of informed influence near the apex of our government would be a godsend. The archipelago needs you, Ashley Biden.

“TODAY IS A DARK DAY”

Mark Rippee of Vacaville, California, has entered what may be the final struggle for his catastrophic life. His survival prospects are not good.

Most readers of this blog know about Mark’s grotesque misfortunes that span thirty-three years. And about the shocking indifference to them among the social services and the members of the Solano County Board of Supervisors. To refresh your memory, click on this blog link to read my previous posts.

Mark Rippee -outside the Vacaville hospital where he was released. Credit: Linda Rippee

Mark was released from a Vacaville hospital on October 26. He had spent two hundred fifty-eight days there, the longest respite of his tortured life since June 1987, when a motorcycle crash left him blinded, his body shattered, parts of his brain exposed, and his mind vulnerable to the schizophrenia that soon struck him. He’d been hospitalized after being struck by a car for a second time while wandering sightlessly around the town.

No agency in the city, the county, or the state of California cares about Mark Rippee. The attached links detail how his sisters Linda Privatte and Catherine Hanson, both women in their 60s with major illnesses themselves, have tried in vain to obtain conservatorship over him and to find a secure place for him to live. The care agencies and political bodies enfold themselves in narrow interpretations of law and policy. The sisters believe that in fact some laws meant to protect people such as Mark have been violated, with no one inclined to enforce them.

The family has been helped, materially and spiritually, by a growing army of concerned friends and Vacaville citizens. The sisters have posted a call for blankets, food, medium-sized long-johns and lined sweatpants, beanies, deodorant, lotion, hand sanitizer, baby wipes, a coat, gloves, socks. And water. Always water. 

To simply read this sad list is to recoil at the scale of difference between Mark Rippee’s plight and the stony disdain—the contempt—of the agencies and the political structure designed to help him.

The charity now arriving is a godsend, and a tribute to the humanity of Vacaville’s private citizens. Yet it is not enough to assure this broken man’s survival. Mark, now 57, remains vulnerable to winter’s ravages, to further collisions with cars and trucks, and—most threateningly—to his environment’s rising Coronavirus rate. Solano County has entered tier 2, the “red” tier, which signals a “substantial” level of infection.

No one tells Mark’s story with more passion and clarity than Linda and Catherine, who have told it to deaf ears for three decades. Their stories and updated reports are linked below.

I’M PAST ANGER. I’M IN COMPLETE DESPAIR by Linda Rippee

Today is a dark day. Mark was discharged from the Acute Care hospital after 258 days of healing from his injuries after being struck by a car for the second time in the last year. He was taken by the facility’s van back to the streets of Vacaville. He left with only a cane, duffle bag, boots, and 2 sets of clothes. They gave him 1-2 months worth of medications but would not confirm what they were. I don’t know how he will know what he is taking or when it is time. He has been on increased Anti-psychotic meds recently and I do not know if he will be on the streets. His new Social Worker is with Solano APS and is the same one who did the “Snapshot Assessment” of Mark and declared him “Not Conservable.” He was planning to meet Mark on the streets of Vacaville to “Receive” him back to town. When we called the facility this morning to check on when he was to be released and how… he was already gone. The nurse claimed, “Oh he is not going back to the streets, but is going to the Vacaville county building!” I started explaining that he is going back to the streets! That is where he has lived on the streets for years! I have 2 people trying to help with getting him a new ID. The facility could not confirm if he even had a blanket. He was supposed to get a flu shot before leaving – he didn’t. We have already put together many things he will need, but with a bad leg and a shoulder that doesn’t work, it will be even more difficult to carry much. He is supposed to still be using a walker – but chose a cane. He will have difficulty social distancing and not touching everything he comes in contact with. They said they gave him a few masks. His discharge was scheduled for 11 am this morning. I tried calling all morning and couldn’t reach him or the Social Worker. It turns out they released him earlier than 11 am, so he was already gone before I could even talk to him. I did not even go to bed last night thinking that tonight Mark will be sleeping on the streets. CJ has been up for two nights bracing herself for his release. His drastic improvement over the last 8 months was not enough proof for the county to comprehend that housing, treatment, and care was exactly what was needed in his case. I am back to taking it day by day to keep him alive. How long before another traffic accident or injury? We know it won’t be long… and we will go back to jumping every time the phone rings.I just received verification from one of our members that he arrived at the Carroll Building in Vacaville and the APS Social Worker was not there! He is now alone and darkness comes.

Linda Rippee

The Road Ahead… by Linda (Rippee) Privatte Updated June 1.

DEMAND ATTENTION FOR JAMES MARK RIPPEE, FROM GOVERNOR, GAVIN NEWSOM & THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA!

Facebook Private Group “Mark of Vacaville”

Am I Not My Brother’s Keeper? Personal Blog by Catherine J. Rippee-Hanson

The Reporter – Family of mentally ill crash victim considering legal avenues

“We’ve lost our compass.” For California’s most visible mentally ill, is a return to forced treatment a solution — or a false promise? by Jocelyn Weiner, CalMatters.org

No One Cares About Crazy People – Mark Rippee Archives, by Ron Powers, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author

After accident they warned about, sisters of mentally ill man blame the state — and beg governor to act

DAY 7 OF LINDEN’S ORDEAL

“No matter the circumstances, what happened on Friday night is a tragedy, and I expect this investigation to be handled swiftly and transparently for the sake of everyone involved.” –Salt Lake City Mayor Erin Mendenhall last Sunday, two days after the autistic 13-Linden Cameron was shot several times by a city police officer. Linden remains in serious condition.


It has been a week. We are waiting, Madame Mayor.

Linden Cameron


https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/09/07/salt-lake-city-mayor/

https://civilrights.org/2020/09/09/the-leadership-conference-on-civil-and-human-rights-statement-on-the-shooting-of-linden-cameron/

https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/takeaway/segments/people-mental-illness-more-likely-be-shot-police

http://www.noonecaresaboutcrazypeople.com/?s=linden+cameron

UPDATE ON LINDEN CAMERON

On Tuesday I posted a blog about Linden Cameron, the 13-year-old Salt Lake City boy who was shot repeatedly by a police officer, whom his mother had called to help him through a psychotic episode.

Linden Cameron

This blog will be brief: Linden is in serious condition—he somehow survived—in a Salt Lake City hospital. Two private citizens have started fundraisers for the medical bills that would otherwise overwhelm his mother. Their links are here https://www.gofundme.com/f/24rhnm8shc  and here https://www.gofundme.com/f/linden039s-medical-bills.


Linden’s story has been picked up by newspaper, broadcast, and online outlets around the world. Below is the New York Times account. I will have more to say on this.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/08/us/salt-lake-city-autism-shooting.html

http://www.noonecaresaboutcrazypeople.com/?s=linden+cameron

A Movie Star, Her Serious New Book, and a Fawning Public That Could Give a Damn

But we care, Diane Keaton. Join our cause to make America care about “crazy people.”

I can visualize the scene: a book-tour venue; a synagogue in Washington. (I can visualize it thanks to the subtly bravura piece by the Washington Post reporter Ellen McCarthy, linked below.) Every seat is taken, because today this is a celebrity book-tour venue. The celebrity author, an iconic movie star, walks onstage. The audience leaps up in a standing ovation. They are mostly middle-aged women who had paid forty dollars each to come and see the movie star in person. In person!

The folks squirm back into their seats and the iconic movie star–Diane Keaton–begins to speak. Diane Keaton has just published her third memoir. It is a departure from the usual books from Hollywood stars. Its subject is her younger brother. Her mentally ill younger brother, whose name is Randy. Its title is Brother & Sister.

Diane Keaton speaks ruefully about the book’s rueful theme, which is her regret over abandoning Randy during the decades when she was driving herself to Hollywood stardom and the adulation of the millions. As children, the two had been close. But Ms. Keaton’s growing fame had come at the expense of this bond. Randy sank into the morass of “alcoholism, joblessness, divorce, isolation, fantasies about violence against women and a suicide attempt,” in reporter McCarthy’s retelling.

Diane Keaton. Photo Credit: Firooz Zahedi / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)

(Brother and sister reconciled some ten years ago, and Keaton now visits Randy in his assisted-living quarters.)

“’There are so many people who live through the pain of having a family member who doesn’t quite fit in,’” she remarked, as McCarthy reports. “She said she wanted to open up a dialogue about mental health and to offer herself up as a cautionary tale that could inspire people to ‘be better’ to their loved ones sooner than she had.”

And then Diane Keaton consented to answering some questions written in advance by audience members.

McCarthy: “The questions . . . had nothing to do with Randy’s [life]. They had to do with [the Keaton movies] Something’s Gotta Give, The First Wives Club and Father of the Bride. With whether Keaton has a favorite co-star.”

And there you more or less have it: No one in the room cared about crazy people. Or if they did care, they kept it to themselves. Diane Keaton’s cautionary tale was smothered–banished, rendered nonexistent–beneath an avalanche of forty-dollar-a-seat celebrity worship. 

And my guess is, that’s the way it will go as long as Diane Keaton continues her tour for Brother & Sister. Lots of jam-packed venues with expensive seating. Lots of standing ovations. Lots of iterations by Diane Keaton about the travails of her mentally ill brother Randy, her lamented separation from him, and the late-life restoration of their loving bond.

Followed by lots of “Do you have a favorite co-star?” “How did you like working on The First Wives’ Club“?

Ms. Keaton, I have an invitation for you. It is for when you grow weary of fielding fangirl and fanboy questions during your tour for the book about reclaiming the union between your brother and you. Or even if you don’t grow weary.

Come and make common cause with us. Give your support to the growing nationwide movement to reform mental healthcare. You will have caught us at the floodtide: our activists have presented proposals to all of the Democratic candidates for the 2020 presidential election. And they have listened, and shown that they care.

This would not require much in the way of your personal time and commitment. Your imprimatur . . . your endorsement of our goals . . . perhaps a shout-out to one of our several organizations or causes, or brief remarks at one of our national gatherings . . . any or all of these things could supercharge our efforts. The moral dimensions of your journey with (and without, and with again) Randy; your insights as a denizen of the pressurized and volatile Hollywood community, where psychic balance often lives at the border of madness; your message to a nation still largely clueless about mental illness . . . and, yes, the weight of your hard-fought and well deserved celebrity hood.

A partial list of leaders in the movement follows. There are many others. Please join us and support us.

The National Alliance on Serious Mental Illness 

Advocates for People With Mental Illness

The Treatment Advocacy Center

The Mental Illness Policy Organization

NAMI

Mark of Vacaville

The National Shattering Silence Coalition

Mental Health for US

The National Coalition for Mental Health Recovery

The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law

The World Federation for Mental Health

Sooner Than Tomorrow (a blog)

Pete Earley’s blog

No One Cares About Crazy People (a blog)

Schizophrenia and Related Disorders Alliance of America

www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/diane-keaton-neglected-her-mentally-ill-brother-for-most-of-his-life-shes-looking-for-redemption/2020/02/14/b854553e-49ed-11ea-9164-d3154ad8a5cd_story.html